Comment: I think it's an inevitable topic for all Libertarians

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I think it's an inevitable topic for all Libertarians

Your comments exactly mirror mine of about 2 years ago. When I first learned of Jacques Fresco, I had similar beliefs. However, after seeing the problems there, I figured there had to be a way of consolidating the two belief systems together. I looked for his transition plan and found it virtually non-existent. While I kind of do believe his plan would work, I also think that to do so, people would simply have to be born into such a system because no rational transition seems probable.

This is how I came to my transition plan. The good news is that we don't have to actually follow it all the way to Jacques' drawing board. We can and likely will stop at 90% of the way, which is essentially a libertarian utopia of sorts.

What I see as key is to return money to its original value. This is the hinge on which everything else pivots. With that in place, workers will regain their status as being in control of the decision to take a job or not. They can dictate that wages outpace inflation (which will be almost non-existent) so their prosperity continually grows. Being able to set their own wages, they will regain the benefits of technological advancement, rather than ceding it to those who only shuffle money around. (That includes both bankers and corporate officers) This will lead to the end of all but the middle class and social problems will dwindle off. On top of that, the increased wealth of the common people will easily handle the reduced need for charity, entitlements and other hand-outs. This basically solves most all of our problems from one single fix. Just solve the money issue.

However, I don't think 'end the fed' rally's are going to do it. They can ignore them too easily. We first have to starve them of any income. That means becoming self sustaining and locally based. By doing this, we cut into the banks' profits enough so that their 100:1 leverage takes them out. Each of these battles won makes the next that much easier to do so the process snow-balls on its own.

When all this takes place, we will find that the money in the hands of the people (the true wealth by then) will be so prevalent that it will lose much of its importance. This is the point when we 'could' switch over to Jacques' Venus Project system, but it wouldn't necessarily be mandatory.