Comment: Dude, what do you think the

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In reply to comment: No, they weren't. You can (see in situ)

Dude, what do you think the

Dude, what do you think the stamp act was all about?? Do you think a jeweler can legally stamp a piece of jewelry 14 kt when it's actually only 10kt?????? I'm done arguing with you about this,, but you are dead wrong!!!!!

The Metals Stamping Act is all about one thing: keeping people honest in describing and marking items of precious metals that are intended for sale or trade. If you mark anything on the work that you produce, you need to know what the legal ramifications of making such a statement are, because by making the mark in the first place, you are making a legal statement that you can be held liable for. First, you should understand the meaning of the term “quality mark”. The FTC defines it as follows:
“As used in these guides, the term “quality mark” means any letter, figure, numeral, symbol, sign, word, or term, or any combination thereof, that has been stamped, embossed, inscribed, or otherwise placed on any industry product and which indicates or suggests that any such product is composed throughout of any precious metal or any precious metal alloy or has a surface or surfaces on which there has been plated or deposited any precious metal or precious metal alloy,”

§ 23.6 Misrepresentation as to silver content.

(a) It is unfair or deceptive to misrepresent that an industry product contains silver, or to misrepresent an industry product as having a silver content, plating, electroplating, or coating.

(b) It is unfair or deceptive to mark, describe, or otherwise represent all or part of an industry product as "silver," "solid silver," "Sterling Silver," "Sterling," or the abbreviation "Ster." unless it is at least 925/1,000ths pure silver.

(c) It is unfair or deceptive to mark, describe, or otherwise represent all or part of an industry product as "coin" or "coin silver" unless it is at least 900/1,000ths pure silver.

(d) It is unfair or deceptive to mark, describe, or otherwise represent all or part of an industry product as being plated or coated with silver unless all significant surfaces of the product or part contain a plating or coating of silver that is of substantial thickness.8

(e) The provisions of this section relating to markings and descriptions of industry products and parts thereof are subject to the applicable tolerances of the National Stamping Act or any amendment thereof.9

Note 1 to § 23.6: The National Stamping Act provides that silverplated articles shall not "be stamped, branded, engraved or imprinted with the word ‘sterling’ or the word ‘coin,’ either alone or in conjunction with other words or marks." 15 U.S.C. 297(a).

Note 2 to § 23.6: Exemptions recognized in the assay of silver industry products are listed in the appendix

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/guides/jewel-gd.shtm

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