Comment: Constitution, Or Declaration?

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Constitution, Or Declaration?

The Declaration Of Independence spells it out quite clearly.

THIS document is what caused the Constitution to be written (13 years later), and the Constitution includes a section that allows for this, as well as the 'Articles Of Confederation', in it's entirety, to be invoked as a permanent part of the Supreme Law.

DISPUTED 'NATURAL LAW' section:
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.
You must really HATE this one:
This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.
AND ALL TREATIES MADE. OR WHICH SHALL BE MADE, UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THE UNITED STATES, SHALL BE THE SUPREME LAW OF THE LAND;...
SO, the Declaration Of Independence AND the Articles Of Confederation REALLY ARE included in this CONSTITUTION, BY LAW.
BUT...
BUT?
BUTT!

I AM
MONTGOMERY SCOTT