Comment: Again I have to fight

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Again I have to fight

Again I have to fight disinformation on nuclear plants. Fracking poses no danger to a nuke, I have worked in a half dozen nukes, we are talking concrete walls 4 feet thick here with steel beams for structural reinforcement. Even an earthquake wont take one down. Fukishima failed not because of the earthquake, but because of the combination of that earthquake with a tsunami. Now do I think fracking is a good idea 500 feet from a plant? Hell no, there is no reason to take that risk, but in reality they couldnt get that close to a nuke anyway...generally the plant owner's property extends about a mile around the plant itself. No other industrial actvities take place on this land. To me the only real danger from nuclear power plants is that they become a HUGE problem in the event of a collapse...whether caused by an economic collapse, a pandemic, an EMP, etc the danger comes when the employees stop showing up for work. Even after its spent a fuel rod must be kept submerged for ten years or so before they stop producing neutron radiation. Neutron radiation is the most dangerous and is only stopped by water and concrete. This is why spent fuel rods are kept in a spent fuel pool until they cool down, this is all well and good but the rods release heat into the water so the water must be circulated by pump to remain cool enough not to boil away and expose the rods to the air, so as long as parts are avaialable and people show up to work its all good....but if people dont show...its only a matter of time till a pump fails, or the fuel rod the reactor runs on runs out, shutting off the pump power, the other unit will supply power for another year before it runs out of fuel as well...the backup diesel generators will only last a couple months at best...so somewhere between 2.5 and 3.5 years assuming nothing breaks down or is sabotaged is the best you could possibly hope for a nuke to run itself...potentially a much shorter time.