Comment: Spooner Missed One Point :

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Spooner Missed One Point :

The Constitution is a Contract. Agreed.

"Basing a belief of liberty on the conclusion that we must constantly engage in political battle by passing codes to secure our rights is insane." Agreed.

A Trust Contract. Point missed. Specifically for "Ourselves and our Posterity".

"Rights" are Personal Property. Not some abstract concept, a plaything of legislation.

www.the-legacy.info/Inheritable%20Property.html

Personally un-endorsed study overview.

THE PURE CONTRACT TRUST IN A NUTSHELL

The Pure Contract Trust is a particular kind of trust. It is based on the U.S. Constitution, Common Law, and extensive case law, including many Supreme Court decisions.

http://www.buildfreedom.com/tl/pct04.shtml

Study from a business point of view. Abstract only openly available, provided below.

Trust, Contract and Relationship Development

Rosalinde Klein Woolthuis. Free University Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Bas Hillebrand. University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Bart Nooteboom.Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Abstract

This article contributes to the debate on the relation between trust and control in the management of inter-organizational relations. More specifically, we focus on the question how trust and formal contract are related. While there have been studies on whether trust and contract are substitutes or complements, they offer little insight into the dynamic interaction between the two. They fail to answer, first, whether contract precedes trust or follows it, in other words, what causal relationship exists between the concepts; second, how and why trust and contract can substitute or complement each other; and third, how the various combinations of trust and contract affect a relationship’s development and outcome. In search of answers, we conducted longitudinal case studies to reveal the relationship between trust, contract and relationship outcome in complex inter-firm relationships. We find trust and contract to be both complements and substitutes and find that a close study of a contract’s content offers alternative insight into the presence and use of contracts in inter-firm relationships.

The Constitution is a Trust : http://www.The-Legacy.Info