Comment: Her

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Jefferson's picture

Her

comments are backed up by multiple independent studies.

"forget the millions of people that have died from bacterial infections prior to antibiotics."

Actually, silver was used in "mainstream medicine" until about 1938.

Colloidal silver was in common use until 1938. Many remember their grandparents putting silver dollars in milk to prolong its freshness at room temperature. At the turn of the century, scientists had discovered that the body's most important fluids are colloidal in nature: suspended ultra-fine particles. Blood, for example, carries nutrition and oxygen to the body cells. This led to studies with colloidal silver. Prior to 1938, colloidal silver was used by physicians as a mainstream antibiotic treatment and was considered quite "high-tech." Production methods, however, were costly. The pharmaceutical industry moved in, causing colloidal research to be set aside in favor of fast working, more toxic and potentially dangerous drugs.

The Food and Drug Administration today classifies colloidal silver as a pre-1938 drug. A letter from the FDA dated 9/13/91 states: "These products may continue to be marketed . . . as long as they are advertised and labeled for the same use as in 1938 and as long as they are manufactured in the original manner." Some of the manufacturing methods used before 1938 are still used today. An electro-colloidal process, which is known to be the best method, is used.

Contemporary Studies

While studying regeneration of limbs, spinal cords and organs in the late 1970s, Robert O. Becker, M.D., author of The Body Electric, discovered that silver ions promote bone growth and kill surrounding bacteria. The March 1978 issue of Science Digest, in an article, "Our Mightiest Germ Fighter," reported: "Thanks to eye-opening research, silver is emerging as a wonder of modern medicine. An antibiotic kills perhaps a half-dozen different disease organisms, but silver kills some 650. Resistant strains fail to develop. Moreover, silver is virtually non-toxic." The article ended with a quote by Dr. Harry Margraf, a biochemist and pioneering silver researcher who worked with the late Carl Moyer, M.D., chairman of Washington University's Department of Surgery in the 1970s: "Silver is the best all-around germ fighter we have."
(be sure to check the "references" at the bottom of the article and research for yourself)
http://www.dazer.com/silver-1.html