Comment: Roads were paved for walking in town. Then bicycling..

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Roads were paved for walking in town. Then bicycling..


Everyday throughout America, the Overspeeder runs over somebody and "escapes." That is the way it reads. At present the 'mobile numbers are so small that ordinary eyes cannot read them, upon a swiftly receding machine, at a distance of a hundred feet - a distance which the machine has covered before the spectator can adjust his focus. I think I would amend the law. I would enlarge the numbers, and make them readable at a hundred yards. For overspeeding - first offence - I would enlarge the figures again, and make them readable at three hundred yards--this in place of a fine, and as a warning to pedestrians to climb a tree. - "Overspeeding," Harper's Weekly, 11/5/1905 (from a letter to the editor dated 10/18/1905)
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Confounded horseless carriages must stay well away from other travelers. Lest they spook the horses & cause folks to lose their manners. For the safety of other travelers, you be sure to send this notice to your dear father. It is for the safety of others walking about where he might drive his horseless carriage. And by all means, have him be mindful to stay off paved roads!

Disclaimer: Mark Twain (1835-1910-To be continued) is unlicensed. His river pilot's license went delinquent in 1862. Caution advised. Daily Paul