Comment: Look into personality typing . . .

(See in situ)


Look into personality typing . . .

(Myers-Briggs, etc) and you find that many people aren't 'Big Picture', long term thinking types. They focus on what they consider 'practical' and 'hands on'. They're by no means stupid, and often are outstanding thinking on their feet in emergency situations. Its just that they usually think about the more immediate. There are also a great number of people who are 'good boy/good girl' types. They are rule followers & respect authority. I don't have the exact figures in front of me now, but something like 2/3 of the population are made up of these two types of people. Most in the military and police fit in these categories.

Secondly, people don't let go of long held beliefs unless they feel a great deal of pain. They identify with those beliefs and think its Who They Are. It feels very threatening when those beliefs are threatened.

So what does this mean ? A large portion of the population isn't predisposed to consider information & ideas that either seem 'too theoretical' or 'speculative'. A great deal of the population won't buck the authority of their own long held beliefs, taught to them since they were children. It won't be until they feel enough pain personally, that they will consider new information & thinking. This is especially true with unpleasant information that often triggers denial in people. They don't want to face it. They feel afraid.

Many changed their views on the Vietnam war after their kids came back in bodybags. Ron Paul got more donations from active military folks than any other candidate from either party. Why ? Those people feel the pain of their loved ones being harmed and away.

All we can do is speak the truth when we know it to others. We're not likely to 'force' anyone to change, if they're not ready to do so. Some day they may feel enough personal pain to be motivated to open up their thinking. If that happens, something you said may be remembered and they may go look into it further.