Comment: The Ramifications of this Definition of Powers Goes Further

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The Ramifications of this Definition of Powers Goes Further

The Ramifications of this Definition of Powers Goes Further.

When you understand the other limits set down upon the federal government by the Founders; and freedoms with regard to Citizen Militias importing arms themselves without restriction.

Marshall states clearly that state Citizen Militias (Citizens) can import arms "without" federal legislative approval as the federal government cannot interpose!

Virginia Ratifying Convention 6-16-1788 - In Full:

http://www.americanpatriotparty.cc/americanpatriotpartynewsl...

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John Marshall: "...Gentlemen have said that the states cannot defend themselves without an application to Congress, because "Congress" can interpose!

Does not "EVERY MAN" feel a "REFUTATION" of the argument in his own breast?

I will show{420} that there could "NOT" be a combination, between those (Founders) who formed the Constitution, to take away this power...." --

If Congress neglect our militia (citizens), "WE (THE CITIZENS THEMSELVES) CAN ARM THEM OURSELVES".

CANNOT Virginia "IMPORT ARMS? >>> CANNOT "she" (THE CITIZENS OF THE STATE) put them into the hands of "HER" (CITIZEN) MILITIA-MEN?..."

(i.e.: THEY / WE / THE CITIZENS THEMSELVES - "CAN" and with a 25 (Citizen) to 1 (Standing Army) - power ratio to oppose if necessary both foreign enemies or the standing US Military as James Madison clearly establishes as a REQUIREMENT in ANY COUNTRY - in Federalist #46)

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The federal government presently using the Commerce clause to restrict or interpose any arm, is clearly outside the delegated powers.

Read how the other Founders such as John Marshall intended and understood in fact what those limits of the federal government were:

Virginia Ratifying Convention 6-16-1788 - In Full:

http://www.americanpatriotparty.cc/americanpatriotpartynewsl...

RichardTaylorAPP - Chair - American Patriot Party.CC

John Locke #201, 202, 212 to 232; Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions 1798; Virginia Ratifying Convention 6-16-1788; Rights of the Colonists 1772.