Comment: What's the difference?

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In reply to comment: not inalienable (see in situ)

What's the difference?

I'd never heard that before. It looks like some drafts of the Declaration used "inalienable" and some "unalienable". This page:
http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/unalienable.htm
(via google cache if that page is still down)
lists seven versions/drafts of the declaration, and which word was used.
Unalienable in:

The Declaration on parchment, now in the Department of State
The Declaration as written out in the corrected Journal
The Declaration as printed by Dunlap under the order of Congress
The copy in the handwriting of John Adams of the "Rough draught" of the Declaration, now at the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Inalienable in:

The draft of the Declaration in the handwriting of Jefferson now in The American Philosophical Society, in Philadelphia
The Declaration in the handwriting of Jefferson now in the New York Public Library
The draft of the Declaration in the handwriting of Jefferson now in the Massachusetts Historical Society, in Boston

So I'm curious what the difference is supposed to be, and what it would mean that Adams used one and Jefferson used the other. Sounds intriguing.