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1) "How do you withdraw from a government that is tyrannical?"

The $64,000 Question, indeed. Seriously and being inspired by Dr. Ron's example, I think the primary way is to become involved politically. Of course that's no guarantee but until conventional policy changes, I don't see otherwise how the unprincipled apparatus of governance can be re-modeled

2) "It becomes even less likely on an individual basis when you give people power over you and society as a whole with the force of arms"

Partially agreed in that IMO larger scopes of governance are often summoned abusively (ex. federal power subjugating a local township). However if a municipal Registry were established where (as mentioned prior) governmental, civil and public sectors properly function as volitional vehicles of endowment, citizens can exercise their conscience and substantially discontinue unethical exploits.
Simultaneously I do also believe that an ethical Constitution should explicitly state that an individual's principled agency (ie. property / currency / corporality [one's body] / sovereignty [free travel] / philosophy [free speech] / spirituality) shall not be violated, thus freeing the public from malignant anarchy

3) "We supposedly have the right to alter or abolish said government.. Yet supposedly with 13% approval rating (congress) and 40%+/- for President this is supposedly a representative government"

True and as you rightly pointed out, the current American model only permits civil prerogative through elected representatives.
I've subsequently been advocating that individuals should be able to represent themselves publicly, hence the idea of a municipal Registry for amenities which also abolishes taxation

4) "Sorry, but I fail to see how setting up a public trust (which I believe you were advocating, correct me if I'm wrong) will be any different since it's been tried already and dived head first into tyranny in less than 250 years"

IMO a point of default has occurred since the majority of governmental models have not yet historically evolved to positively sanction the dignity of choice

5) "how can you setup a system where the people have the right to withdraw?"

Just as Jefferson, MLK and RP have done before, I believe enacting that solution is the political call of our present generation

6) "When a government grows it always assumes powers it doesn't have"

Incorrect: as the US Constitution evolved, the Bill of Rights was established and IMO the closest law yet to the previous ideals

7) "try withdrawing now you'll have a gun pointed at you and threatened with death or imprisonment"

Indeed. Hence the just cause of principled agency before us is meaningful and morally correct