Comment: http://www.marketwatch.com/st

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http://www.marketwatch.com/st

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/yahoo-dispels-first-mover-myth

While the title of above link seems to agree with you, actually the entire link speaks about how Yahoo made some tremendous mistakes sabotaging its own network effect. May I remind you that there is no company behind BTC and thus no single point of failure, like with Yahoo and geocities? If BTC has flaws, they have the entire world as resource to improve upon the design. And I do acknowledge that if BTC reaches a certain size, it will be much harder to implement controversial updates to it, but that initself means that BTC has already reached critical mass.

Another reason first movers usually fail, is because like the link stated, they were too far ahead of their time. The technology and ease of use in order to fully utilize the idea wasn't present yet. I don't see most of these problems pop up with BTC, for one, because people have learned much from those times and now realize how important ease of use is to the people. People like Steve Jobs have taught the industry how important it is to have a polished product. The giants from the past on which shoulders we stand right now have enabled us to innovate faster and faster, with less mistakes on the way. Does this mean that BTC will not have unforeseen hurdles that it needs to overcome? No, such situations may indeed arise, but remember, bitcoin is updateable. If there ever arises a situation where it cannot easily update to solve the problem, it already means that it has reached critical mass.

As for infrastructure, you have a very limited view of what infrastructure actually entails or what it requires. My impression is that your view of infrastructure is purely technical and seen from a software standpoint. When most people use the term infrastructure, they actually mean it in the marketing way, which is the usual interpretation of the word and is vastly broader than its pure software interpretation. Mind you, this is just my impression, I might be wrong, so please tell me if I'm wrong.

Might I enquire what you actually understand under infrastructure?