Comment: Why?

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Why?

Although it is true that one of the murdered young men was a dual U.S.-Israeli citizen, why is an American Senator expending so much energy calling attention to a relatively insignificant murder in a foreign land? Is this really a normal relationship between two countries, when American politicians find it necessary to comment on something like this, which is relatively minor, especially when wars are raging, when Christians have been entirely driven out of Mosul in Iraq, when murderous gangs attack Ahmadiyya and Ismaili Muslims in Pakistan, when awful violence rages just across the American border in Mexico?

What the hell is going on?

Right now, there are gang wars raging in America's cities in the summer heat. Every week-end during the summer, there are veritable bloodbaths in cities like Detroit, Gary, Indiana, and Chicago. This past week-end, in Chicago alone, there were 35 people injured in shoot-outs that also left one person dead. The week-end before that, 5 were shot dead and an additional 19 were wounded. Yet our Senator writes no op-ed for those victims.

Rand Paul also lies when he writes this:

I think it is clear by now: Israel has shown remarkable restraint. It possesses a military with clear superiority over that of its Palestinian neighbors, yet it does not respond to threat after threat, provocation after provocation, with the type of force that would decisively end their conflict.

The night before the op-ed was published, Israeli authorities took the bold move of resuming home demolitions. The homes belonging to the families of the two suspected murderers were demolished in a punitive action by the Israeli Defense Forces. I would note that the men have not yet been found guilty in any court of law; the family homes were simply destroyed:

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/182374

The witnesses said the houses of Marwan Kawasmeh and Amar Abu-Eisha in Hevron were blown up, in what a human rights group said was the first punitive demolition since Israel halted the practice in 2005.